Thursday, October 22, 2015

Microorganisms in the sea organize their power supply via nanowire power cables

Sorry guys, all that hard work only to find out that microorganisms in the sea organize their power supply via nanowire power cables.

Phys.org reports:

"Electrical energy from the socket - this convenient type of power supply is apparently used by some microorganisms. Cells can meet their energy needs in the form of electricity through nanowire connections. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered these possibly smallest power grids in the world when examining cell aggregates of methane degrading microorganisms. They consist of two completely different cell types, which can only jointly degrade methane. Scientists have discovered wire-like connections between the cells, which are relevant in energy exchanges."
Electrical energy from the socket - this convenient type of power supply is apparently used by some microorganisms. Cells can meet their energy needs in the form of electricity through nanowire connections. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered these possibly smallest power grids in the world when examining cell aggregates of methane degrading microorganisms. They consist of two completely different cell types, which can only jointly degrade methane. Scientists have discovered wire-like connections between the cells, which are relevant in energy exchanges.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-microorganisms-sea-power-nanowire-cables.html#jCp





Archaea (red) yield eight electrons from the oxidation of a single methane molecule. The electrons travel via the nanowires to the sulphate reducing bacteria (green). The bacteria use those electrons to convert one molecule sulphate into hydrogen sulphide. Credit: MPI f. Marine Microbiology



Electron micrograph of the nanowires shows connecting archaea and sulphate reducing bacteria. The wires stretch out for several micrometres, longer than a single cell. The white bar represents the length of one micrometre. The arrows indicate the nanowires (A=ANME-Archaeen, H=HotSeep-1 partner bacteria). Credit: MPI f. Biophysical Chemistry

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-microorganisms-sea-power-nanowire-cables.html#jCp
More information: Gunter Wegener et al. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria, Nature (2015). DOI: 10.1038/nature15733

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-microorganisms-sea-power-nanowire-cables.html#jCp
Electron micrograph of the nanowires shows connecting archaea and sulphate reducing bacteria. The wires stretch out for several micrometres, longer than a single cell. The white bar represents the length of one micrometre. The arrows indicate the nanowires (A=ANME-Archaeen, H=HotSeep-1 partner bacteria). Credit: MPI f. Biophysical Chemistry

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-10-microorganisms-sea-power-nanowire-cables.html#jCp