Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Forge Nano and Argonne improve yield in propylene manufacturing by ALD coating

Propylene, a precursor for commodity chemicals and plastics, is produced by propane dehydrogenation (PDH). In a PDH process, propane is selectively dehydrogenated to propylene. Production capacity via PDH is slated to grow rapidly over the next several years. The single feed/single product feature is one of the most attractive aspects of PDH, especially for propylene derivative producers looking to back-integrate for a secure and cost-effective source of propylene (IHS Markit Report LINK). 

Despite its simple chemistry, industrial implementation of PDH is very complicated owing to side reactions such as: 
  • deep dehydrogenation
  • hydrogenolysis
  • cracking
  • polymerization
  • coke formation.
According to a recent publication by Forge Nano and Argonne National Lab, an increase in PDH yield via added catalyst activity, lifetime, or selectivity represents significant energy and economic savings. 

The researchers has demonstrated that by using Pt dispersed on Al2O3 extrudate supports as a commercially relevant model system and by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) metal oxide overcoats, the metal-active sites can be tailored to increase PDH yield and selectivity. 

In the study they investigate the interplay of Pt loading, ALD overcoat thickness, and Al2O3 support surface area on PDH activity, selectivity, and catalyst stability. 

They were able to show that applying a 6–8 Å thick layer of Al2O3 on low-surface area Al2O3 supports of ∼90 m2/g surface area yields the optimal combination of stability and activity, while increasing propylene selectivity from 91 to 96%. Please find further details in the paper linked below.

Catalyst preparation method, Graphical abstract (https://doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.0c03391)


Atomic Layer Deposition Overcoating Improves Catalyst Selectivity and Longevity in Propane Dehydrogenation
Zheng Lu, Ryon W. Tracy, M. Leigh Abrams, Natalie L. Nicholls, Paul T. Barger, Tao Li, Peter C. Stair,
Arrelaine A. Dameron, Christopher P. Nicholas, and Christopher L. Marshall

ACS Catal. 2020, 10, XXX, 13957–13967
Publication Date:November 16, 2020

https://doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.0c03391

2 comments:

  1. Powder coating guns is used to apply the powders. There are a variety of weapons available, including the corona charging gun, which utilizes electrical power to charge the powder. The powder is charged using friction in the tribal charging pistol. The powder is flung from the perimeter of the bell by the bell charging cannon, which creates a charge on the powder. The outcome is the same regardless of whatever kind of electronic gun you employ. The powder adheres to the object's surface. It is heated to melt the powder, which adheres to the object's surface, giving it a hard, strong, and abrasion-resistant skin. The effect of the final cured layer is comparable to two-pack wet paint. Visit the Eptex Coatings website to know more about this process.

    ReplyDelete